Health officials are investigating three new mystery cases in Sydney’s west, with a plea for residents of Greystanes, Berala, Auburn and Lidcombe having the mildest symptom to test

NSW recorded three locally acquired cases from western Sydney on Friday, following the unlinked Croydon cluster that emerged the day before, with two men infected – one in their forties and one in their twenties – and the third Case is close contact with one of the men

Despite concerns about the recent outbreak, Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said she would announce on Saturday a relaxation of restrictions on northern beaches, particularly those in the southern zone

“It gives us a bigger heart that most, if not all, of the community broadcast has really occurred in this region,” she said

Ms. Berejiklian said Thursday was around 32 until 8 p.m.000 people tested. The Avalon cluster is now 146 after linking two previous mystery cases

NSW health officials also had a breakthrough with Chief Health Officer Dr Kerry Chant, who detailed the results of genome sequencing This indicated that the Croydon Cluster in Sydney’s inner west has been linked to the Northern Beaches eruption

The two cases recorded in Wollongong are also genetically linked to the Avalon cluster, however, the physical links between these cases have yet to be determined

Dr Chant said research also found a case from the Croydon cluster and one case from the Wollongong cluster on Jan. December had visited the Swallowed Anchor restaurant in Wollongong

“This was before either the Croydon Cluster case or the Wollongong case became infected and we are investigating whether both were infected at that time and date,” said Dr Chant

“There may have been someone at this restaurant who unknowingly had COVID at the time and then had exposures or connections to the venues on the northern beaches. It’s important that we get to the bottom of this and so I challenge everyone at this venue to get tested

“We currently have some missing links. We hope to be able to solve these puzzles in the coming days”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison delivered an optimistic message at a separate press conference on the first day of the new year He commended the Australians for being tested in large numbers and announced that over 63 in the final months of the year000 overseas citizens had returned year

On border closings, the prime minister, forced to stay in Canberra for the coming week due to the ACT’s border restrictions on NSW, said he understood the frustrations of the people affected by border closings and wanted more coherence / p>

In total returned between September and 30 December 63109 Australians returned to the country, Morrison said, twice the government’s original target for the period

Meanwhile, the Victorians have rushed to return home before the state line with NSW closes Motorists spend hours in traffic jams that are reported to extend up to 25 miles from border checkpoints

At around 3 a.m. on Thursday at 30 p.m., the Victorian government announced that the border would be closed to all Victorians from 11 a.m. regardless of where they were in NSW at 59 p.m. on New Years Day

NSW Police Minister David Elliott said Victorian Prime Minister Daniel Andrews and other states had overreacted to the situation in NSW

“They don’t take into account the population and the percentage of people that are diagnosed with COVID-19, so I would like them to be opened as soon as possible, “he said

“We have to make sure that we bring everything into line. We are one nation, we are not a collection of nation-states”

Stay informed of the news you need to know related to the pandemic, sent Monday and Thursday, subscribe here

Anna Patty is a senior writer for The Sydney Morning Herald, focusing on higher education.She is a former workplace editor, education editor, state political reporter, and health reporter

Berala

World News – AU – ‘We have missing connections’: Three mysterious COVID-19 cases in western Sydney

Source: https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/we-have-missing-links-three-mystery-covid-19-cases-in-western-sydney-20210101-p56r61.html